Timeline:

1st April 2019
' Nominations Open '
3rd May 2019
' Nominations Close '
31st July 2019
' Shortlist Announced '
4th October 2019
' Awards Ceremony '

Winners

Care Quality Commission Joint Network Voice

Historically CQC has had multiple equality networks, each focussed on a sub-set of the wider Diversity and Inclusion agenda. Over the last 18 months network chairs identified a need to leverage best practice and create shared goals and objectives, establishing one mechanism to drive fundamental change across CQC in a dynamic and visible way. This team is known as Joint Network Voice (JNV).
Members of JNV have dedicated considerable time, on top of their day job, to create an enduring impact on CQC. Over the last 18 months they have been role models in the organisation, collaborating closely with colleagues in the organisational development team. They have increased engagement levels and drive internal change on agenda items such as; inclusivity of the culture at CQC, improved recruitment practices, cross grade mentoring and support and training to senior staff on the importance of a diverse and inclusive workforce. 
Their goals and objectives are clear, targeted and relatable to staff across the organisation. The momentum for change they are creating internally will enable CQC to become an example of best practice and in turn allow CQC the platform to drive external change with the organisations it regulates. 
JNV are clear that for change to be enduring it needs to be championed by the Leadership and be collaborative. As a result, CQC is the first public sector organisation to give a speaking seat on the Board to a Diversity and Inclusion Network. 
We are beginning to see positive effects from the work that JNV are doing. The networks have partnered with each other and with the business, keeping collaboration at the heart of their approach. We are seeing increasing openness, fostering conversations that were once difficult to have and ultimately and championing a dynamism in the leadership of inclusion and diversity.

Compass Network

Compass aims to ensure the Naval Service is inclusive of all sexual orientations and gender identities, ensuring our people feel comfortable, valued and empowered to be themselves, realising their career potential and as a result maximising OpCap.

It provides peer support from members including our active allies network, with lanyards and email signatures used to demonstrate proud and visible membership. The network provides a dedicated confidential support email address.

Compass uses a closed facebook group and regular emails to keep members informed on events; an annual conference and forums are used to discuss issues including gender identity, mental health and same-sex adoption, working closely with partners from Defence, Public and Charitable sectors to support these events.

Compass is a Pride in Public foundling member, a consortium of public sector networks, and shares its experience on numerous events both with the Public and private sectors, this includes internationally Defense Engagement initiatives in Australia, Italy and USA in the last year; indeed the repeal of 'Don't Ask Don't Tell' in the US was a result of evidence provided by the network.

The network works closely with Navy Command and our senior advocate, to ensure positive impact on policy implementation, with recent examples of Defence's Future Accommodation Model and Pre-Exposure HIV Prophylaxis for Service Personnel.

The network has a wide-raging community engagemnet programme, participating in 16 prides annually along with other events including the LGBT History Month Out At Sea families day and Compass actively influences through social media. The network instigated the UK's first maritime pride event with other public organiations on the River Thames and gave LGBT+ young people a chance to experience life at sea on a warship. The network provide inspirational school talks and supports charitable work notably for a London refuge that supports LGBT+ victims of domestic violence.

Home Office / The NETWORK

The Home Office and its Race Equality staff support, The NETWORK, recognised that we didn’t have enough BAME SCS staff to have truly ethnically diverse panels, and to ensure all our SCS PB1 panels had ethnic diversity for all panels, we set out from Early 2018, to have truly independent panel members(IPMs) at interview and selection process at all SCS Pay Band 1 level boards, we trained 20 G6 BAME staff to assess on panels with parity of decision making.
In the last reporting year, we provided over 50 BAME IPMs and feedback from both BAME and non-BAME panel members has been overwhelmingly positive. Not only does this mean that every Home Office SCS PB1 panel is now visibility ethnically diverse, but by having ethnicity diverse IPMs at every stage in the recruitment process; at sift and interview stage, from outside of the recruiting business areas, brings a diversity of approach, opinion, thought and lived experience, to create true challenge, provide true independent scrutiny and rigor to the process of Home Office leadership appointments at both sifting and interview panels.
By utilising our talented BAME G6s, we are actively investing and valuing them as equals whilst developing them. We are also showcasing our BAME talent to candidates to demonstrate that we are proud of our diversity staff make up. 
The Home Office became the first department to deliver this systematically and has seen an increase in both BAME success applicants shortlisted for interview from 7.8% in 2017-2018 to 10% in 2018-2019, with appointments rising from 5.6% to 9.3% at the same time, we appointed the first ever HO BAME Director General and have the highest number of BAME SCS (a key Cabinet Office target grade) in government, including this first ever BAME Principle Private Secretary to both the Permanent secretary and separately to the Second Permanent secretary.

Care Quality Commission Joint Network Voice

Historically CQC has had multiple equality networks, each focussed on a sub-set of the wider Diversity and Inclusion agenda. Over the last 18 months network chairs identified a need to leverage best practice and create shared goals and objectives, establishing one mechanism to drive fundamental change across CQC in a dynamic and visible way. This team is known as Joint Network Voice (JNV).
Members of JNV have dedicated considerable time, on top of their day job, to create an enduring impact on CQC. Over the last 18 months they have been role models in the organisation, collaborating closely with colleagues in the organisational development team. They have increased engagement levels and drive internal change on agenda items such as; inclusivity of the culture at CQC, improved recruitment practices, cross grade mentoring and support and training to senior staff on the importance of a diverse and inclusive workforce. 
Their goals and objectives are clear, targeted and relatable to staff across the organisation. The momentum for change they are creating internally will enable CQC to become an example of best practice and in turn allow CQC the platform to drive external change with the organisations it regulates. 
JNV are clear that for change to be enduring it needs to be championed by the Leadership and be collaborative. As a result, CQC is the first public sector organisation to give a speaking seat on the Board to a Diversity and Inclusion Network. 
We are beginning to see positive effects from the work that JNV are doing. The networks have partnered with each other and with the business, keeping collaboration at the heart of their approach. We are seeing increasing openness, fostering conversations that were once difficult to have and ultimately and championing a dynamism in the leadership of inclusion and diversity.

Community Rail Team D&I

Connecting Communities with the Railways: The Community Rail Development Strategy

Community rail is all about connecting diverse communities to the railways through local partnerships, groups, organisations, social enterprises and volunteers. Community rail originally developed in the 90s as a grassroots movement to shine a light on neglected and at-risk parts of the network, as communities came together to safeguard the future of their local lines. The Government’s original strategy published in 2004 largely focussed on this first imperative of ensuring that local lines remain relevant and whilst it encouraged community engagement, the focus was around attracting new passengers to grow local markets and reducing costs. 
The new strategy which was published in 2018 has recognised that the nature and focus of community rail activity has evolved beyond that. The Community Rail Team recognised that community rail can be at the vanguard of supporting the Government and rail industry to unlock the social value of the railways and has been bold in doing that. A key pillar of the new strategy is bringing communities together and supporting diversity and inclusion which sets out how community rail activity can help open up our railways to a wider group of people, making them more accessible and providing children, young people and others with the skills and confidence needed to access the opportunities it offers.
During the two-year development of the strategy, the team adopted an inclusive and collaborative approach so those who would be integral to its successful delivery have all played a key role in its development and have embraced it as their own, fully understanding the role that our railways will play in the future prosperity of our country and how community rail organisations, need to ensure that the most vulnerable in our society are a part of that success too. 

Durham Tees Valley Support for Schools Team

Pupil Referral Units (PRUs) and alternative curriculum schools welcomed the teams support. The team recognised that raising aspirations and preparation for work go hand in hand to help those from disadvantaged backgrounds. Employers and training providers had previously being unwilling to attend such schools due to pre-conceived ideas. The Social Mobility Agenda and the new Careers Stategy has changed the thinking on this. We have delivered sessions to the most vulnerable and disadvantaged students, ensuring that regardless of the students background they don’t get left behind. The Support for School team have worked tirelessly to engage with employers and partners. Working with schools in the most deprived areas, the team has introduced the students to more than 15 employers such as J&B Recycling & Start Energy, which has led to more informed students, employer visits and even apprenticeship offers. The team has introduced students to providers such as Stronger Families, National Citizen Service (NCS) and Successful Futures. They have offered a range of activities and opportunities including an ECO project and confidence building. The team have used their own creativity to design and deliver a range of bespoke employability sessions including The World of Work programme for students with mental health issues. Often students from lower social economic backgrounds may lack self esteem, even excluded from mainstream school. The team have worked to break down the stigma and barriers faced by these students. By introducing them to employers and providers the team have raised he students aspirations about future employment and allowing them to realise that where they start off in life does not have to be where you end up. The team has given the students an insight into the world of work and helping the students realise their full potential.

GLD Social Mobility Network and GLD Race Network

We would like to nominate our Social Mobility and Race Networks jointly for the outstanding work they have done in outreach and recruitment to advance entry into the Government Legal Department for under represented groups.

Our Social Mobility Network have undertaken a number of outreach actions in recent months:

- They visited Immanuel College in Bradford to conduct mock interviews with year 11, 12 and 13 students.
- In February, they produced an easy to follow toolkit for outreach activities, including suggestions for workshops with small groups of students, ice breakers, speed networking exercises and an off shelf powerpoint presentation on being a Government lawyer.

Both networks contribute to GLD's Summer Diversity Scheme. GLD partners with the Law Society, the BLD Foundation, Brunel University, Social Mobility Foundation and Aspiring Solicitors, who, between them, select 30 students from BME backgrounds or from lower economic backgrounds. The students are given a week of work shadowing, practical workshops, application workshops and a tour of the Supreme Court in order to showcase the life of a government lawyer as an attractive career option.

The GLD Race network provided an evidence base to Senior Management on why targets are necessary for SCS representation. GLD is not obliged to set a target for BME representation in the SCS, but has set a target of 12% by June 2020, which will be reviewed and updated. We also piloted our BME Mentoring scheme this year, where grade 6 BME colleagues were paired with a director general mentor and grade 7s were paired with director level mentors.

The GLD Race network also curated an ambitious programme of Black History Month events, including talks by historians, investigative journalists, artists and curators, as well as contributions from the Civil Service Race Champion and the Ethnic Diversity Programme.